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Underwater photo of Line 5
SCREEN SHOT OF A BALLARD MARINE INSPECTION VIDEO / ENBRIDGE ENERGY

Judge extends temporary restraining order, allows West leg of Line 5 to resume for testing

The order stops short of granting Attorney General Dana Nessel’s request for an injunction against the company - instead extending and modifying the existing restraining order. Enbridge will be allowed to restart the western leg of Line 5 in order to conduct safety testing. The eastern portion will remain shutdown. David Holtz is with the environmental group Oil and Water Don’t Mix, which advocates for a shutdown of the pipeline. “I think the Attorney General got what she needed which is a...

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Kevin Lavery

The new policy means Lansing police won’t pull drivers over for so-called secondary violations.  Those include things like cracked windshields, loud exhaust and broken tail lights.  LPD Chief Daryl Green says it’s an effort to protect the constitutional rights of citizens and eliminate bias-based policing.  

“We’re listening to community members and obviously the current environment.  We just want to be progressive and move these initiatives fastly through our community.”

Underwater photo of Line 5
SCREEN SHOT OF A BALLARD MARINE INSPECTION VIDEO / ENBRIDGE ENERGY

The order stops short of granting Attorney General Dana Nessel’s request for an injunction against the company - instead extending and modifying the existing restraining order. 

Enbridge will be allowed to restart the western leg of Line 5 in order to conduct safety testing. The eastern portion will remain shutdown.

David Holtz is with the environmental group Oil and Water Don’t Mix, which advocates for a shutdown of the pipeline. 

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Across the state, some 19 percent of residents report being housing insecure according to US Census data - meaning they either did not pay last month’s rent or mortgage and are unsure they can pay next month’s.

Jim Schaafsma is an Attorney with the Michigan Poverty Law Program. He says based on Fair Market Rent amounts in the state if just 63-thousand of the state’s lowest-income renters get assistance for one month it would cost 56-million. 

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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said Wednesday that she was closing indoor seating in bars in parts of the state, including a college town where one brewpub has been linked to about 140 infections.

Whitmer also signed a bill allowing bars and restaurants to sell to-go cocktails in an effort to help those businesses.

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michiganhhs / michiganhhs

Orders have been issued by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services that allow for expanded visitations at nursing and other residential facilities. Visits to the facilities have been restricted to slow the spread of COVID-19. The two orders signed Tuesday by MDHHS Director Robert Gordon allow exceptions to the restrictions as long as the facilities meet specific safety requirements, such as requiring masks during visits. Gordon noted the hardship residents of the facilities have faced because they have been unable to see loved ones because of the pandemic.

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Steven Marson had more than 100 contracts for public fireworks displays, the majority of them scheduled for this weekend, before the pandemic hit Maine and prompted cancellations. Now, he has eight.

Marson, who runs Central Maine Pyrotechnics, says the steep decline in business has cost him about a million dollars so far.

"I could be out of business if this continues into 2021 because I don't have the means to keep going when you have not revenue coming in," he says.

Marson's not alone.

In a year marked by coronavirus fears, a slowing economy and nationwide protests calling for an end to systemic racism, more and more Americans are looking to arm themselves, according to a key government indicator.

The FBI reported that Americans set a new record of 3.9 million background checks to purchase or possess firearms in June. That eclipsed the previous record set in March of 3.7 million background checks.

If you're traveling this holiday weekend or if you have guests coming your way, there's a good chance you live in a state affected by a mandatory 14-day travel quarantine.

As new COVID-19 hot spots erupt around the country some public health officials say the measures could help contain the spread. But the rules are a patchwork and enforcement differs state-by state.

"We have a $5,000 penalty" for violating the traveler quarantine, said Hawaii's attorney general, Clare Connors. "It's a misdemeanor, which means it's punishable by up to a year in prison."

Florida's surge of COVID-19 cases shows no signs of slowing down. The state Department of Heath reported Florida set another daily record Thursday, with 10,109 cases, surpassing Saturday's record of 9,585 cases. That brings Florida's total confirmed coronavirus cases to nearly 170,000 and a death toll of 3,617 (with 67 new deaths reported Thursday).

A Black Facebook employee is accusing his employer of racial discrimination.

In a complaint filed Thursday with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Oscar Veneszee Jr. said the social network does not give Black workers equal opportunities in their careers.

Mourners gathered Thursday to bury Haacaaluu Hundeessaa, a popular singer and activist whose killing has catalyzed massive protests and stoked ethnic tensions for days across Ethiopia. Dozens of people have died in the unrest after the singer was shot to death earlier this week — but the violence didn't dissuade scores from seeking to attend his funeral in the town of Ambo.

With around four out of 10 homes in the U.S. yet to be tallied for the national head count, the Census Bureau has announced the first six places in the U.S. where unresponsive households will get in-person visits starting later this month.

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET

The FBI has arrested British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell on multiple charges related to the serial sexual abuse of girls and young women by the late financier Jeffrey Epstein.

"Maxwell was among Epstein's closest associates and helped him exploit girls who were as young as 14 years old," Audrey Strauss, acting U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, said at a news conference Thursday.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

Employers added a record 4.8 million jobs last month, as the U.S. economy continued to slowly bounce back from a deep and painful coronavirus recession. The unemployment rate dipped to 11.1%.

Job growth accelerated from May, when revised figures show employers added 2.7 million jobs.

Kevin Lavery

The new policy means Lansing police won’t pull drivers over for so-called secondary violations.  Those include things like cracked windshields, loud exhaust and broken tail lights.  LPD Chief Daryl Green says it’s an effort to protect the constitutional rights of citizens and eliminate bias-based policing.  

“We’re listening to community members and obviously the current environment.  We just want to be progressive and move these initiatives fastly through our community.”

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