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Watch: GRPD suspends cop after video shows officer punching suspect in leg 30 times

A Grand Rapids Policeman has been suspended after cellphone video of an arrest shows the officer repeatedly punching an African-American in the leg as he lay on the ground. WGVU’s Daniel Boothe has the details. A cellphone video uploaded to Facebook is going viral that shows Grand Rapids Police officers pulling a man suspected of speeding from his car, tasing him, while one officer punches the man roughly 30 times in the leg. VIDEO: https://www.facebook.com/flyboyentertainment/videos...

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National Poison Prevention Week runs until Saturday.  Kent County’s Department of Public Works along with the Kent County Health Department are encouraging the community to safely dispose of items that could pose a danger.

Residents in Kent County are being encouraged to properly and safely dispose of unused, potentially poisonous medicines, chemicals and used needles through various “SafeHomes” programs.  The programs include, SafeMeds, SafeChem and SafeSharps. 

Journalism training and careers at the University of Michigan will get a boost through a $300,000 gift named after a Pulitzer Prize-winning alumna. The Ann Arbor school says the Lipinski Journalism Fund has been started by retired Tribune Co. Chair and Chief Executive John W. Madigan and his wife, Holly. The fund will support initiatives at The Michigan Daily student-run campus newspaper to expose more nontraditional students to journalism careers. It also will provide training and mentorship opportunities for high school students and current Michigan Daily staff.

Michigan's lawmakers and governor would be subject to public-records requests under bills moving forward in the Legislature.

The House voted unanimously Tuesday for a package that aims to end Michigan's status as one of just two states to fully exempt the Legislature and governor's office from Freedom of Information Act requests. The legislation goes to the Senate for consideration next.

Information such as communications with constituents could be exempt from disclosure.

Similar bills passed the House in recent years only to die in the Senate.

A Grand Rapids Policeman has been suspended after cellphone video of an arrest shows the officer repeatedly punching an African-American in the leg as he lay on the ground. WGVU’s Daniel Boothe has the details.

A cellphone video uploaded to Facebook is going viral that shows Grand Rapids Police officers pulling a man suspected of speeding from his car, tasing him, while one officer punches the man roughly 30 times in the leg.

VIDEO: 

State lawmakers want to give librarians immunity from any issues that could arise if they administer opioid overdose medication.

       A state house committee passed the bills today.

The quiet, secluded nature of libraries makes them an attractive place for some drug users to get their fix.

Librarians can administer overdose medication like NARCAN. But some don’t carry it because they could be sued if something goes wrong.

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When Cyclone Idai, a devastating tropical storm, swept across southeastern Africa on Thursday, it killed at least 150 people, displaced hundreds of thousands and left Beira, a coastal city of a half-million people in central Mozambique, almost totally destroyed.

In the aftermath, with some of their neighbors still trapped on rooftops or in trees, some local residents began the long process of recovery with a small but notable rebuttal to nature, by beginning to move the beach back to its rightful place.

Appeals judges of the U.N. War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia have upheld Radovan Karadzic's conviction for genocide in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre that claimed the lives of some 8,000 Muslim men and boys.

They also ruled that the 40-year sentence of Karadzic handed down in the first trial, in 2016, was too light given the gravity of the crimes.

Along with the late Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic and Serbian army general Ratko Mladic, Karadzic was a key figure in the Bosnian war.

Democratic presidential hopefuls are betting on bold.

The majority of the Democrats running for president want to create a national health insurance program. Several want to do away with private health insurance entirely. Candidates are engaging on questions about reparations for slavery, and most of the White House hopefuls have endorsed the goal of a carbon-neutral economy within the next decade.

Increase the size of the U.S. Supreme Court? Several candidates are now on board.

The European Commission is hitting Google with a fine of 1.49 billion euros (some $1.7 billion), saying the search and advertising giant broke the EU's antitrust rules and abused its market dominance by preventing or limiting its rivals from working with companies that had deals with Google. The case revolves around search boxes that are embedded on websites — and that display ads brokered by Google.

National Poison Prevention Week runs until Saturday.  Kent County’s Department of Public Works along with the Kent County Health Department are encouraging the community to safely dispose of items that could pose a danger.

Residents in Kent County are being encouraged to properly and safely dispose of unused, potentially poisonous medicines, chemicals and used needles through various “SafeHomes” programs.  The programs include, SafeMeds, SafeChem and SafeSharps. 

"Khosh amadee!" Omaid Sharifi, co-founder of ArtLords, an art collective, says as he invites us into his house in a manner that reflects true Afghan hospitality—with grace, a smile and open arms.

The United States may have committed war crimes as it bombed al-Shabab militants in Somalia, a new report Amnesty International alleges.

Researchers for the human rights group investigated five U.S. airstrikes and found that they had resulted in 14 civilian deaths. The U.S. has "indiscriminately killed some of these civilians," Abdullahi Hassan, a Nairobi-based researcher for Amnesty, said in an interview.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern returned to Christchurch for the second time since a gunman killed 50 people in an attack on two mosques last Friday.

Her first stop was at Cashmere High School, which lost two current students and one former student in last week's shooting, NPR's Rob Schmitz reported.

The hashtag #AbledsAreWeird started with a childhood memory that occurred to writer and disability rights activist Imani Barbarin: she was in her community swimming pool when a man threw her crutch into the pool to "help her swim." Naturally, the crutch sank and she had to fetch it from underwater.

One of the first things I did when I moved to Austin a decade ago was visit the Gutenberg Bible housed in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

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