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LaGrandLaw.com

Criminal justice changes continue to move through state Legislature

Lawmakers at the state Capitol have made changing the state’s criminal justice system a priority this session. Two packages of bills are close to the governor’s desk – with crucial votes taking place earlier this week. One would raise the age for when a person is automatically considered an adult for certain crimes from 17 to 18. Another would change the state’s civil asset forfeiture laws. Democratic Representative David LaGrand is a bill sponsor for civil asset forfeiture. He says the...

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A judge says the federal government can be sued by Flint residents who blame the Environmental Protection Agency for waiting too long to intervene in the city's water crisis.

Federal Judge Linda Parker didn't determine whether EPA employees were negligent when Flint's water system became contaminated with lead in 2014 and 2015. The decision at this stage is more narrow, with the judge saying Thursday that the government isn't immune to a lawsuit.

Federal charges have been filed against an Indiana man who authorities say threatened to shoot President Donald Trump in Facebook posts.

The indictment says 20-year-Steffon Gonzalez posted on March 28 that he was "standing outside the president's location with a bullet 'chambered' to 'blow his head off."' Trump had a rally that day in Grand Rapids, Michigan .

Gonzalez lives in Hobart, about 145 miles southwest of Grand Rapids.

LaGrandLaw.com

Lawmakers at the state Capitol have made changing the state’s criminal justice system a priority this session.

Two packages of bills are close to the governor’s desk – with crucial votes taking place earlier this week.

One would raise the age for when a person is automatically considered an adult for certain crimes from 17 to 18.

Another would change the state’s civil asset forfeiture laws.

Devin Schindler photo
Western Michigan University

The Justice Department has released a redacted version of Special counsel Robert Mueller's report into Russian meddling in the 2016 Presidential election. WGVU talks with Constitutional attorney who has read the 448 page report.

“There is this tremendous sense particularly among the more conservative press, that this document somehow exonerates the president. Well, nothing could be further from the truth.”

An animal rarely seen in Michigan has been released in the wild in the Upper Peninsula. A Canada lynx was captured weeks ago in Sanilac County in the Lower Peninsula. After spending time at the Howell Nature Center and the Detroit Zoo, the female was released last week in a wooded area in Schoolcraft County. John DePue, a biologist at the Department of Natural Resources, says the release "went perfectly."

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On a bright Sunday afternoon in early March, the Tamir River in the steppes of Mongola becomes a bowling alley. Two dozen Mongolian herdsmen have gathered to play musun shagai, known as "ice shooting." Right now, the ice on the river is perfect. Clear and smooth. The players are cheerful and focused.

Their goal? To send a small copper puck called a zakh down a 93-yard stretch of ice and knock over several cow ankle bones, painted red, none bigger than a golf ball, at the other end. Extra points for hitting the biggest target, made of cow skin.

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

More than 200 people were killed and hundreds more were injured after multiple explosions tore through Sri Lanka in a series of coordinated blasts that struck hotels and churches. It marked the country's worst violence since the end of its civil war in 2009.

The blasts started as people began gathering for mass on Sunday for Easter. In Colombo, the capital, blasts were reported at St. Anthony's Shrine and three high-end hotels, the Shangri-La, the Cinnamon Grand and the Kingsbury.

At least 130 people have been killed in coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka that targeted luxury hotels and churches, as people gathered for Easter services.

The Iowa caucuses are still nine months away, and with at least 20 Democrats either considering a run or officially declared, many of them are looking for ways to stand out in the crowded field. One tried-and-true way: show up in voters' homes.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Yellow vest protests grew violent on Saturday as firefighters battled several fires amid clouds of tear gas in eastern Paris.

Police in Northern Ireland have arrested two men in connection with the shooting death of a 29-year-old journalist in Londonderry on Thursday night.

Authorities say they arrested an 18- and 19-year-old under the U.K.'s controversial Terrorism Act and took them to the Musgrave Serious Crime Suite, a police station in Belfast.

The latest book-length tell-all on life inside President Trump's White House has appeared, and it's just as unsparing about dysfunction and deception as all those earlier versions by journalists, gossip mavens and former staffers. Maybe more so.

The difference is that the president likes this one.

Or at least he says he likes it. And it's probably not because of the catchy title (Report on the Investigation Into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election), or any previous works by the author, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Inmates are among the least-educated people in America. That's despite research that shows education is one of the most effective ways to keep people from coming back to prison.

Now, there's renewed interest in giving adults behind bars better access to higher education. A new bipartisan bill in Congress would allow incarcerated people to use federal Pell Grants — designed for low-income students — to pay for higher education, including college classes and workforce training.

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741.


If you know someone struggling with despair, depression or thoughts of suicide, you may be wondering how to help.

The quiet of the late-winter morning is interrupted by a staccato of gunshots.

"Military drills," shrugs Kim Seung-ho, 58, the director of the DMZ Ecology Research Institute, a nonprofit organization that does research on the wildlife in the Demilitarized Zone, or DMZ, which is the border area between North and South Korea. A thick blanket of fog seeps over the forested hills on this late-winter morning as Kim stands, searching the horizon for birds, on the bank of the Imjin River just north of Paju, South Korea.

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