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Muskegon County voters reject special education services millage

Polling station
Hilary Farrell
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In Muskegon County, voters Tuesday said “no” to a millage that would have helped fund local school district’s special education services.

Residents on the lakeshore community turned down the proposal by an unofficial 61 percent as of early Wednesday morning.

The millage would have brought in nearly $9 million for special education services, something that Muskegon Area Intermediate School District officials said had been “persistently underfunded.”

The last time Muskegon County voters approved a special education millage came in 1980.

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