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Cuts to GRPD's budget coming in light of "recent events"

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Grand Rapids City Manager Mark Washington made announcement Tuesday.

After weeks of protests over the shooting death of Patrick Lyoya, the City of Grand Rapids Tuesday announced it is cutting the police department’s budget.

In a news release, Grand Rapids City Manager Mark Washington’s said the cuts to the GRPD’s funding is influenced by "recent events," as the police department’s budget will be reduced by $12,000.

Meanwhile, the city’s Office of Oversight and Public Accountability’s will grow from just under $406,000 to $2.3 million under Washington’s proposed 2023 budget.

In the release, Washington explained,

“Recent events require leaders to address urgent questions…those include improving public safety, accelerating police reform….and supporting the community’s equitable recovery and growth.”

If approved, the budget would go into effect July 1st.

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