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Kent, Ottawa County election results include some big wins for area school districts

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Coopersville, Wyoming and Kent City all come away with victories

Unofficial results are in for a number of proposals in Kent and Ottawa Counties.

Kent City Community Schools officials are celebrating after voters passed millage renewals for both an operating cash and a sinking fund to pay for upgrades and renovations across the district.

Voters in Wyoming said “yes” to a 25-year, nearly $25 million bond to renovate the district’s junior high school that officials say, haven’t seen renovations in over 40 years.

Meanwhile, Coopersville Area Public Schools Bonding Proposal passed by a narrow margin at an unofficial 51 percent of the vote Tuesday.

School officials say, the money will fund construction of more classrooms, upgrade security and aging infrastructure.

To Grand Haven, where voters said “yes” to the Fire and Rescue Department Millage Renewal Proposition for the purchase of future emergency vehicles.

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