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Michigan receiving millions of dollars to replace lead pipes in the state

An image provided by the Environmental Protection Agency shows examples of a lead pipe, left, a corroded steel pipe, center, and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. The EPA is only now requiring water systems to take stock of their lead pipes, decades after new ones were banned.
Environmental Protection Agency
An image provided by the Environmental Protection Agency shows examples of a lead pipe, left, a corroded steel pipe, center, and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. The EPA is only now requiring water systems to take stock of their lead pipes, decades after new ones were banned.

Michigan has more than 330-thousand service lines that are likely to contain lead

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is giving Michigan more than $61 million to continue lead pipe replacement projects across the state. The funds are part of a $3 billion dollar infrastructure package to keep lead out of drinking water nationwide.

Hugh McDiarmid is a spokesperson for the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy. He says the money will go into a state fund for drinking water infrastructure improvements.

“At the end of the day, you know, we try to allocate some money to you know, where the need is greatest, and to the communities that fit the criteria for it.”

According to recent data from the federal government, the state needs more than $16 billion to replace all remaining lead service lines.

As WKAR's Bilingual Latinx Stories Reporter, Michelle reports in both English and Spanish on stories affecting Michigan's Latinx community. Michelle is also the voice of WKAR's weekend news programs.
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