U.S. Supreme Court

Lake Michigan
3bylunch via Wikimedia | CC BY 2.0 / Wikimedia.org

A years-long dispute over the ownership of Lake Michigan's shoreline may be headed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports that Justice Elena Kagan last week approved a request from Bobbie and Don Gunderson's attorneys to extend the deadline for seeking a U.S. Supreme Court review to Oct. 5.

The Gundersons alleged that their lakefront property should extend to the water's edge. The Indiana Supreme Court in February ruled that the state owns the shoreline .

Las Vegas sportsbook
Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court has struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. How could the ruling impact the future Michigan sports betting?

WGVU spoke with Michael Huff an attorney with Grand Rapids-based law firm Mika Meyers where he specializes in corporate and real estate with an interest in sports law. Huff is currently a member of the Sports Law Association which he tells us is a national organization for lawyers who practice in the area of sports law. We begin our conversation with Huff’s intrigue with professional sports, sports wagering and the law.

Las Vegas sportsbook
Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions.

How does the ruling affect Michigan sports betting? WGVU spoke with a local attorney specializing in the field.

“You know this case potentially opens a huge can of worms.”

Michael Huff is an attorney with Grand Rapids-based law firm Mika Meyers. He is currently a member of the Sports Law Association.

Mark Sanchez
Courtesy photo / LinkedIn.com

U.S. Supreme Court case will decide e-commerce taxes and we discuss Michigan venture capital and angel investing.

Wiki commons

The Supreme Court says Congress acted within its authority when it ended a lawsuit that began over a Native American tribe's Michigan casino.

The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that Congress acted lawfully when it passed legislation that resulted in the lawsuit's dismissal.

The case was making its second appearance before the justices. Michigan resident David Patchak sued in 2008 after the Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians got the go-ahead to build a casino on land near his property.

gavel
succo via Pixabay | CC BY 2.0 / Pixabay.com

A judge has reduced a sentence for a southern Michigan man convicted of murder as a teenager to at least 37 years in prison.

The Battle Creek Enquirer reports 41-year-old Terrence Kelly is the second of eight juvenile lifers from Calhoun County to be re-sentenced after a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that life without parole for juveniles is cruel and unusual punishment.

Kelly already has served more than 23 years toward the new 37- to 60-year sentence. Kelly's attorney Sofia Nelson argued for a minimum sentence of 25 years.

pixabay.com

Three men on Michigan's sex offender registry have settled a federal lawsuit over housing requirements that restrict where they can live.

The Grand Rapids Press reports they'd been told they couldn't live in homes that were within 1,000 feet of a school zone.

Attorney Sarah Riley Howard challenged the restriction as vague.

The settlement with the state comes after the U.S. Supreme Court let stand a decision in a similar case that found Michigan had excessive restrictions.

Poker casino game
Ab5602 via Wikimedia | Public Domain / Wikimedia.org

Supreme Court justices suggested Tuesday that they would side with a Native American tribe in Michigan in a case that arose out of the tribe's construction of a casino.

The case the justices heard oral argument on Tuesday has already been to the Supreme Court once.

Scales of Justice
Tim Evanson via Wikimedia | CC BY 3.0 / wikimedia.org

The Supreme Court has upheld a lower court's ruling that said significant changes to Michigan's sex offender registry law could not be applied retroactively.

Michigan asked the high court to take up the issue after a 2016 federal appeals court ruling, but the Supreme Court declined in an order Monday.

The appeals court said that retroactively applying the changes to people already on the list would unconstitutionally increase punishments after offenders' convictions.

Wiki commons

The Supreme Court won't take up a challenge to a Michigan law that allows the state to temporarily take away local officials' authority during financial crises and appoint an emergency manager.

The Supreme Court declined Monday to hear the case.

Voters and elected officials were challenging a state law that says that to rescue financially stressed cities and school districts the state can reassign the governing powers of local officials to a state-appointed emergency manager.

An emergency manager was in place during the water crisis in Flint.

Pages