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Philomena V. Mantella portrait
gvsu.edu

GVSU Board of Trustees unanimously approves Philomena V. Mantella as its first woman president

Grand Valley State University’s board of trustees has unanimously approved the university’s next president. Philomena V. Mantella will be the first woman leading the institution in its nearly 60 year history. She’ll become GVSU’s fifth president replacing Thomas J. Haas. “This nation needs breakout universities and they need universities that are courageous and look beyond their own interest to both the learners they serve and the communities they serve. So, I’m really excited to get going on...

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A lame duck law adding new requirements for getting measures on the state ballot has been called into question.

One of the most controversial provisions puts a cap on how many signatures can be collected from each Congressional district. No more than 15 percent of the total signatures gathered can come from one congressional district.

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has asked Attorney General Dana Nessel for a formal opinion in the constitutionality of this provision, and others.

Soon after the request, Nessel accepted.

Lawmakers in Lansing are contemplating ways to help furloughed federal employees get by until the government reopens.

   There are thousands of federal employees in Michigan that haven’t been paid since December.

There’s no specific proposals yet. But the Speaker of the House is collecting ideas and wants to see what options are available.

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson
Wikimedia Commons

Michigan's new secretary of state is calling into question the constitutionality of a Republican-enacted law that makes it harder to initiate ballot drives.

Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, sought a formal opinion Tuesday from Democratic Attorney General Dana Nessel. Such opinions, while not the same as legal rulings, are considered to bind state agencies unless reversed by a court.

Philomena V. Mantella portrait
gvsu.edu

Grand Valley State University’s board of trustees has unanimously approved the university’s next president. Philomena V. Mantella will be the first woman leading the institution in its nearly 60 year history. She’ll become GVSU’s fifth president replacing Thomas J. Haas.

Officer shot, wounded during mid-Michigan traffic stop

11 hours ago
police car lights
Scott Davidson via Wikimedia | CC BY 2.0 / Wikimedia.org

Authorities say a police officer has been shot and wounded during a traffic stop in mid-Michigan. Saginaw Township police Chief Don Pussehl says the Saginaw Township officer stopped a motorist about 2 a.m. Tuesday in Saginaw County's Kochville Township and the driver shot him as he approached the vehicle.

Pussehl says the officer radioed for help after the shooting and was described as being in "somewhat stable condition." Pussehl says police are searching for the motorist, who fled. The officer's name and a description of the suspect weren't immediately released.

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cironline.org

Tuesday, January 22nd @ 10:00 on WGVU Public Television - PBS FRONTLINE and NPR investigate an aggressive lung disease impacting thousands of Appalachia coal miners. WGVU talks with NPR correspondent Howard Berkes about the documentary, Coal's Deadly Dust.

It's a meeting of two truly American pastimes: football and lawsuits.

First, the football.

Late in regulation in Sunday's NFC championship game, the New Orleans Saints were tied 20-20 with the Los Angeles Rams in pursuit of the Super Bowl.

~~~~~https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FForTheWin%2Fstatus%2F1087126552184184832~~~~~~

As the ball sailed toward Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis, Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman knocked into Lewis, appearing to make helmet-to-helmet contact. Officials called no pass interference or helmet-to-helmet penalties.

A lame duck law adding new requirements for getting measures on the state ballot has been called into question.

One of the most controversial provisions puts a cap on how many signatures can be collected from each Congressional district. No more than 15 percent of the total signatures gathered can come from one congressional district.

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has asked Attorney General Dana Nessel for a formal opinion in the constitutionality of this provision, and others.

Soon after the request, Nessel accepted.

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to review a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census, according to a Justice Department filing released Tuesday.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

As the partial government shutdown hits a record 32nd day, the Senate is set to consider two competing proposals this week that could reopen the government — but probably won't.

Lawmakers in Lansing are contemplating ways to help furloughed federal employees get by until the government reopens.

   There are thousands of federal employees in Michigan that haven’t been paid since December.

There’s no specific proposals yet. But the Speaker of the House is collecting ideas and wants to see what options are available.

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson
Wikimedia Commons

Michigan's new secretary of state is calling into question the constitutionality of a Republican-enacted law that makes it harder to initiate ballot drives.

Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, sought a formal opinion Tuesday from Democratic Attorney General Dana Nessel. Such opinions, while not the same as legal rulings, are considered to bind state agencies unless reversed by a court.

When Jason Rezaian moved to Tehran to pursue journalism in 2009, he knew he was taking on a certain amount of risk.

"I think everybody who goes and works in a country like Iran makes those calculations and thinks about that," he says. "You don't have to read a lot of history to know that journalists have been targeted there in the past."

Still, Rezaian reasoned, if he was careful and "played very closely by the rules" — being transparent about the work he was doing and the people he was communicating with — he would be safe.

In 2018, Americans watched as California towns were incinerated by fires, hurricanes devastated coastal communities and a government report sounded the alarm about the impacts of a changing climate.

All those factors contributed to significant changes in perceptions of global warming in the U.S., according to the authors of a new public opinion survey.

The proportion of Americans who said global warming is "personally important" to them jumped from 63 percent to 72 percent from March to December of last year.

One in 3 U.N. employees has reported being sexually harassed in the past two years, according to a survey that the United Nations released last week.

It's part of an unfortunate trend in the humanitarian sector: complaints about sexual harassment, bullying and other unacceptable workplace behavior.

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