trade war

U.S.-China flags
Pixabay

The Ambassador of China to the United States visited Grand Rapids Friday as a guest of the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. Retired Ambassador Nicholas Burns was at his side for a discussion about the trade war and future U.S.-China relations and the global economy. 

His Excellency Cui Tiankai, Ambassador of China to the United States says China abides by World Trade Organization rules.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

“Solid growth” is the term best used to describe West Michigan’s economy for the month of June. Some of the lowest unemployment in the state can be found in the region. But heading into July the folks at Supply Management Research will be keeping a close watch on a growing tariff war and how it may be impacting local industries.

Paul Isely, Associate Dean in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
Grand Valley State University

President Donald Trump isn't budging on his international tariff stance so far despite remarkably public pleadings from House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republican allies to back off his threat and avoid a possible trade war.

Trump says, "We're not backing down." But he's holding open the possibility of exempting longstanding friends Canada and Mexico if they agree to better terms for the U.S. in revising the North American Free Trade Agreement.

flickr.com

President Donald Trump says "we're not backing down" on his push to impose tariffs on imported steel and aluminum despite criticism from fellow Republicans. WGVU’s Patrick Center spoke with an economics professor about those tariffs - and the potential for a trade war – and what its impact could have on Michigan consumers and industry.

“Here in Michigan we make cars. We’re good a t making cars. We make a lot of them.”

Dr. Paul Isely is currently the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University.

Wikimedia Commons

President Donald Trump is looking for advice from a range of lawmakers as he considers whether to impose trade sanctions on aluminum and steel imports.

The president is meeting at the White House with nearly 20 lawmakers, including a number of senators representing Rust Belt states like Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan.

Trump says the administration is "considering all options" but he's considering issuing "tariffs and/or quotas."