Supply Management Research survey

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The July Supply Management Research survey indicated the trade war with China and its tariffs slowed new orders coming in to West Michigan manufacturers.The recently released August survey presents a swing to marginal growth.

“Well, last month we were a little bit worried because we posted some of the most negative numbers that we’ve posted in a long time. But this month, those numbers came back to, what I guess I would say is, a flat report.”

Brian G. Long is director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

West Michigan’s economy is being impacted by the U.S.-China trade war. Data from the July Supply Management Research survey indicates the tariffs are impacting a number of key economic indicators, but one in particular putting a drag on the growth rate.

The U.S.-China trade war that began a year-and-a-half ago is, as Brian G. Long is director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University puts it, “catching up with the West Michigan economy.”

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

Uncertainty creeping into the national and global economy is impacting the confidence level of local purchasing managers in the May Supply Management Research survey.

There are also signs the economy is slowing “Our local index of business confidence as fallen to near record low levels.”

Brian G. Long is director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University.

“And at the same time Market.com, who also surveys business confidence for the United States, indicates that their survey has fallen to a record low level.”

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The April Supply Management Research survey indicates the West Michigan economy continues its decades-long slow growth pattern. However, there’s data suggesting  the West Michigan economy could cool in the months ahead.

It began in March when the 70 area purchasing managers surveyed by the Institute for Supply Management Research indicated their optimism in the economy is beginning to wane. Fast forward to April and they’re signaling business is slowing.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

Ten years ago the recovery from the Great Recession officially began. For the West Michigan economy it’s been a decade-long pattern of slow growth. The March Supply Management survey indicates the pattern holds true with confidence beginning to slip.

The Institute for Supply Management Research surveys 70 purchasing managers from the Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo area. In March, their optimism in the economy began to fade.

Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The West Michigan economy got off to a slow start in the New Year with January figures considered flat. In February, the trend returned to the decade-long pattern of slow growth since the recovery began from the Great Recession. WGVU looks at the data from the most recent Supply Management Research survey.

Following an uninspiring January, Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research at the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University, explains the West Michigan economy showed a rebound.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The West Michigan economy is off to a slow start in the New Year. The January figures generated in the recent Supply Management Research survey indicates the local economy is flattening out. What does that mean now and for the year ahead?

“Our numbers are not negative they are just not as robust as some of the numbers that we saw earlier in 2018.”

Brian G. Long is director of Supply Management Research at the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University. He says business leaders surveyed are much more cautious than just a few months ago.

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The West Michigan economy has been on a roll the past three months. The recent Supply Management Research surveys indicate September was strong, October was stronger and November was the best month of the year. But how long can the growth last with signs of a stock market contraction and tariffs weighing on the economy?

“We’re still getting some incentive out of last year’s tax cut. But that so-called sugar high is starting to show signs of having run its course.”

Brian G. Long, director of Supply Management Research in the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The recently released Supply Management Research survey indicates the West Michigan is strong. The October numbers touched on historically low unemployment and continued momentum in a number of West Michigan industries.

“Our auto parts suppliers are still going great guns.”

Brian G. Long is director of Supply Management Research at the Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University. He says economists are surprised by auto sales figures provided by industry leaders.

Mark Sanchez photo
Courtesy photo / LinkedIn.com

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