Learning

school bus photo
Jared and Corin via Wikimedia | CC BY 2.0 / wikimedia.org

Michigan legislators gave final approval Monday to bills that would provide flexibility for K-12 schools as they prepare to open amid the coronavirus pandemic, waiving physical attendance and minimum instruction requirements to allow for remote classes.

chalk and chalkboard in an education classroom
Public domain image via Wikimedia / wikimedia.org

Michigan legislators have given final approval to bills that would provide flexibility for K-12 schools as they prepare to open amid the coronavirus pandemic. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer will sign the legislation to waive physical attendance and minimum instruction requirements to allow for remote classes. The legislation would give districts and charter schools the option to choose in-person instruction, online or a hybrid based on consulting with local health departments.

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State superintendent Michael Rice delivered a report today to the Michigan State Board of Education. He offered some recommendations on handling in-class and remote learning in the new school year.

       Rice recommends the Legislature rely on last year’s student count and funding formula when setting a state school budget. Rice says he has not given up hope on another round of financial assistance from Washington.

       Rice says he’s aware that leaves a lot of gaps and uncertainty. But, he says, the situation is unprecedented.

Grand Valley State University arch photo
gvsu.edu

Grand Valley State University’s Board of Trustees is delaying its 2021 budget awaiting state appropriations clarity. It did approve a boost in student financial aid while also raising tuition.

The coronavirus pandemic shifted the education model at Grand Valley State University from classroom to virtual learning.

School Room
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A lawmaker warned Tuesday of a potential 25% cut in state funding for K-12 schools because of economic fallout from the pandemic, saying he is not “banking” on Congress sending additional aid to states or giving flexibility to use previously passed rescue money.

GVSU President Tom Haas
Courtesy photo / Grand Valley State University

During a recent Grand Rapids Rotary Club luncheon, Dr. Thomas Haas, Chair of Michigan’s 21st Century Education Commission and President of Grand Valley State University explained Michigan students are underperforming.

Haas spoke with WGVU about the report and the commission tasked with making recommendations for revamping the state’s education delivery system.

Learning Difference Resource Group

Aug 24, 2015

We talk about the Learning Difference Resource Group. They have a new name and a new CEO and are planning to become the regional leader in learning disabilities and a national model for collaborative, comprehensive services. Nanette Clatterbuck joins in.