Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies

Lynne Olson photo
Courtesy photo

Populism and isolationism are on the rise around the world. A New York Times best-selling author and historian visited Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies explain the value of international alliances in 21st Century foreign policy and politics.

Sunday commemorated the 80th anniversary of Germany’s invasion of Poland marking the beginning of World War II. Confronting the Axis powers, 30 countries formed the Western Alliance.

Thomas J. Haas, President of Grand Valley State University photo
gvsu.edu

Grand Valley State University President Thomas J. Haas is retiring after 13-years leading the institution. Thursday evening he shared his leadership philosophies with the graduating class from the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies. Before the event, President Haas spoke with WGVU.

Republican and Democrat logos
flickr.com

Understanding America’s political is one way to better understand the current divide challenging the country today. A group of experts gathered Friday, April 12th on Grand Valley State University’s downtown campus for a Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies event called, “Searching for Deeper Common Ground.”

“The polarization is so bad in this country I think we’re really risking the democracy itself.”

Thomas Jefferson portrait
Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Jefferson was one of the nation's founding fathers and was also a slave owner. DNA testing suggests he fathered children with slave, Sally Hemings.

Earlier this years, Grand Valley's Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the university's Division of Inclusion and Equity hosted historians Annette Gordon-Reed, from Harvard University, and Peter S. Onuf, retired from the University of Virginia discussing Jefferson, Slavery, and the Moral Imagination.

General Wesley Clark photo
flickr

Retired four-star General Wesley Clark visited Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies where he spoke about overcoming the polarization in American politics.

“What you find is that politics is more about the heart than it is about the head.”

In 2004, retired four-star General Wesley Clark ran as a Democratic presidential candidate. Clark explains the emotional reaction to politics is widening and the media covers the conflict.

President Ronald Reagan with the Sand Diego chicken
Wikimedia Commons

Presidential historian and author H.W. Brands was guest of Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies.

His presentation Comedian-in-Chief: What Presidents' Humor Says About Them, and About Us begins with the seriousness of President George Washington to President Donald Trump.

Thomas Jefferson portrait
Wikimedia Commons

Many Americans revere Thomas Jefferson as a founding father establishing the principles of a young republic. Jefferson was also a slave owner and DNA suggests he fathered children with Sally Hemings. What do we do with that information today?

Two scholars visiting Grand Valley’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies tackle the troubled crossroads of race and American memory.

“What’s the point of talking about Jefferson at this time moment since he seems to represent a past we are reputiating.”

John Meacham speaking at GVSU Eberhard Center
gvsu.edu

Presidential historian John Meacham, author of the recently released book “The Soul of America” visited Grand Valley State University in partnership with the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation and Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum. Meacham explains the political rancor permeating American society is nothing new offering a way forward. 

Republican and Democrat logos
flickr.com

Studies indicate Americans are increasingly lonely. Is that loneliness contributing to a growing political divide? There’s a centuries old prediction that this would be the case that begs to ask if our democracy at risk?

The search for political common ground has become a challenge for Americans. While it’s a frustrating challenge, Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University’s says we cannot avoid it.

Gleaves Whitney, Director Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University
gvsu.edu

The search for political common ground has become a challenge for Americans. While it’s a frustrating challenge, the director of Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies says we cannot avoid it. Gleaves Whitney confronted the issue last night in Grand Rapids during his address titled, Common Ground? He explains it is essential we reach out to people with whom we disagree in order to make our democracy work.

Pages