COVID-19

Dana Nessel photo
Dana Nessel

Michigan’s Attorney General is asking home improvement stores strictly abide by the “Stay Home, Stay Safe” executive order.

Unsplash

The loans are designed so that if businesses primarily put the money towards payroll, rent, or utilities, they will be completely forgiven. 

The program is funded through the coronavirus CARES act which recently passed through congress.

Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist says the program is aimed at keeping employers, and their staff, afloat. 

“Making sure they have the ability to retain their people and also to be able to have loans to open up that they will not have to pay back if they retain their people.”

Michigan lawmakers spar over emergency length, need to meet

33 minutes ago
Gov. Whimter's office

  Michigan lawmakers plan to convene to lengthen Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s emergency declaration amid the coronavirus pandemic but are at odds over the extension and whether the session is even necessary.

The Republican-led Legislature is scheduled to meet Tuesday, three weeks after last voting. Since then, one legislator has died from a suspected COVID-19 infection and another has tested positive, causing uneasiness over congregating in Lansing.

State officials require faster reporting of COVID-19 deaths

37 minutes ago
18th Wing Public Affairs

State officials issued an emergency order designed to speed up the reporting of COVID-19 deaths in Michigan as the number of cases continued to surge.

The Department of Health and Human Services issued a directive late Saturday for funeral directors and medical professionals. Under the order, funeral directors have 24 hours to initiate a death record and and submit it to the attending physician. Doctors have to attempt to certify the record within 24 hours of receipt, among other things.

A child looking upward while holding a teddy bear
JBER

In a matter of weeks, COVID-19 has upended the lives of children and families across Michigan. School closures and movement restrictions are disrupting children's routines and support systems while adding new stressors on caregivers.

“When we look at families who are losing their jobs, being laid off, not having income to pay their rent, you can see an increase in stress within those homes that can be directly related to an increase in child abuse and neglect.”

GVSU Education Farm photo
gvsu.edu

Low-income families are being especially hard-hit during the coronavirus pandemic. Grand Valley State University is donating all produce grown from its educational farm to those who need it most.

The spring growing season is underway at Grand Valley State University’s educational farm. When students and farm volunteers were sent home to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the administration suggested donating the crops.

Amy Simonson and Dan Stuglik and cardboards silhouettes of guests they had invited to their wedding
Screenshot from Amy Simonson and Dan Stuglik

  Cardboard cutout wedding guests will make for a not-so-cookie-cutter wedding as a Michigan couple prepares to tie the knot during the coronavirus pandemic. After Amy Simonson and Dan Stuglik’s wedding plans were disrupted amid the outbreak, a packaging company donated more than 100 cardboard cutouts to pose as stand-ins for the family and friends who couldn’t attend the wedding this Saturday because of Michigan’s stay-at-home order. The Herald-Palladium reported Menasha Packaging Co.

SMART bus for Detroit downtown
Wikimedia Commons

  Officials say a Detroit bus driver who had expressed anger on Facebook about a coughing passenger has died. Fifty-year-old Jason Hargrove felt ill about four days after posting a passionate video on social media on March 21. Glenn Tolbert of the bus drivers union says Hargrove died Wednesday. In his Facebook video, Hargrove was frustrated over a woman's repeated coughs on his bus. He said “some folks don't care.” Hargrove said bus drivers are just “trying to make a honest living.” Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says everyone in America should watch the video.

Wikimedia Commons

The Grand Rapids Public Schools District is making the transition from face-to-face learning to a virtual classroom housed on the internet.

“We are securing learning management systems that are effectively used across the country to support teaching and learning but online.”

That’s John Helmholdt, Director of Communications at GRPS. He says the challenge is a large percentage of GRPS families don’t have the technology for engaging in a virtual classroom.

“And so, we would look to distribute wireless hotspots along with the technology.”

Shutterstock

  

With Grand Rapids hospitals experiencing a major shortage of nasal swabs for COVID-19 test kits, a local West Michigan company has been hard at work ramping up production. As cases of coronavirus ncrease across the state of Michigan, health officials say the supply chain surrounding vital test kits for the virus remains fragile. In Grand Rapids, hospitals are specifically running out of the sterile nasal swabs used to conduct coronavirus testing.

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