budget

Governor Gretchen Whitmer portrait
Michigan.gov

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has signed onto a $150 million funding package to fight the coronavirus pandemic while vetoing $167 million she says should be saved as Michigan confronts likely plummeting tax revenues amid the pandemic's economic fallout. Just weeks ago, the Democratic governor and Republican-led Legislature agreed to additional mid-year spending to fund their priorities after a budget impasse last fall.

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Pixabay

Michigan lawmakers and Gov. Gretchen Whitmer have agreed to $321 million in spending that will be used to combat the coronavirus, provide financial assistance for older adults go to community college and partially revive the state's tourism advertising campaign. The supplemental bills won bipartisan approval from the Republican-led House on Tuesday and could be passed by the GOP-controlled Senate on Thursday. The Democratic governor will sign the legislation. Some of the money will partly restore funding that she vetoed last fall amid a budget impasse over fixing the roads.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer portrait
Michigan.gov

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has proposed a $61.9 billion state budget, including what she says would be the biggest increase for Michigan classroom operations in 20 years. The plan unveiled Thursday would boost overall spending by 3.9%. The Democrat proposes increasing base per-student funding by $225, or 2.8%, for most schools. She also proposes a $60 million boost for special education and a $60 million increase for academically at-risk and economically disadvantaged students.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer 2019 State of the State Address
mi.gov

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer says Michigan will borrow $3.5 billion to rebuild state highways and bridges over five years. She calls it a responsible way to start fixing deteriorating roads after the Republican-led Legislature rejected her proposed fuel tax hike. The Democrat unveiled the bonding plan during her second annual State of the State speech on Wednesday. She says it will enable the state to do about twice as much construction on I-, U.S.- and M-numbered routes as it can now.

Michigan Department of Corrections seal
en.wikipedia.org

A technology change is forcing Michigan's corrections department to spend about $4.6 million to fit more than 4,000 parolees and others under state supervision with new ankle monitors. Michigan Department of Corrections Public Information Officer Chris Gautz says the change is necessary because the 3G-enabled monitors won't work because Verizon is upgrading its network from 3G to 4G. He says the process of swapping out devices for those wearing the ankle bracelets is expected to take about 45 days.

Michigan Capitol Building photo
Phillip Hofmeister via Wikimedia | CC BY 3.0 / wikimedia.org

The state Senate today (Thu.) took steps toward restoring money to programs vetoed by Governor Gretchen Whitmer earlier this year. The budget bills are supposed to be approved by the House and the Senate and sent to the governor’s desk next week.

The Senate actions are a step toward restoring a working relationship between the Democratic governor and the Legislature’s Republican leaders following a contentious budget process. The standoff put money for autism services, charter schools and public safety at risk.

Michigan Capitol Building photo
Phillip Hofmeister via Wikimedia | CC BY 3.0 / wikimedia.org

The Republican-led Legislature has passed legislation that would restore more than half of the proposed spending that was vetoed by Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

The votes are a sign that Michigan's budget impasse may soon end.

The Senate and House approved bills Wednesday to reverse some of Whitmer's line-item vetoes and fund transfers. Negotiations continue on curbing the powers of the State Administrative Board.

Both sides are optimistic a final deal could be reached next week.

Photo of MI Governor Gretchen Whitmer wearing a red suit standing at a podium
Governor Gretchen Whitmer

  No progress was made toward resolving a monthslong budget impasse over the Legislature’s multi-week break, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said Monday, adding that a top Republican lawmaker’s criticism of her could impede efforts to find common ground.

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Pixabay

A budget impasse in Michigan is starting to take a toll on government programs and services.

Sheriff's offices, jails, charter schools, private colleges, hospitals, local governments and nonprofits are casualties of the standoff that has dragged on much longer than expected.

Nearly two months ago, Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer vetoed an unprecedented $947 million in funding to restart broken-down budget talks.

Michigan Capitol Building photo
Michigan Legislature

A budget standoff between the Republican-led Legislature and Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is unlikely to be resolved until December at the earliest.

The Michigan House won't convene for voting Wednesday. It began a three-week hunting and Thanksgiving break last week but had left open the possibility of meeting Wednesday if a deal was in reach.

The Senate will meet Wednesday before taking two weeks off. The House could return for a day next week if an agreement is struck, though the sides don't seem optimistic.

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