When it comes to rules for impeachment West Michigan U.S. Reps. Huizenga and Amash at odds

Oct 31, 2019

U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-Zeeland, MI-2)
Credit votesmart.org

A sharply divided House of Representatives has approved the rules for its impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. How did local U.S. Representatives vote?

“This is outside the norm of anything that we have seen regarding impeachment in the past.”

U.S. Representative Bill Huizenga recalls the Nixon and Clinton impeachments drew bipartisan support.

Thursday's near party-line vote broke with a 232-196 roll call. It was the chamber's first formal vote on a process that's likely to take months, possibly stretching into the early weeks of the 2020 election year.

The Zeeland Republican takes issue with Democrats inquiry.

“This is unprecedented how they are doing it. My committee, the Financial Services Committee, is one of the named six committees. I have yet to see or hear anything about any of the information that is being gathered. In fact, they’re not allowing us to see it. It’s going to get shipped over the Intel Committee, which by House rules, only the Intel Committee members are going to be able to see this information and they’re not allowed to talk about it outside of that committee. So, how in the world are we supposed to take an informed vote if we do not have access to the information.”

U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (I-Cascade Twp., MI-3)
Credit amash.house.gov

U.S. Rep. Justin Amash from Cascade Township, who left the GOP on July Fourth announcing his designation as an Independent voted in favor of rules for impeachment tweeting, “This president will be in power for only a short time, but excusing his misbehavior will forever tarnish your name. To my Republican colleagues: Step outside your media and social bubble. History will not look kindly on disingenuous, frivolous, and false defenses of this man.”

Patrick Center, WGVU News.