Former Michigan Congressman and national security expert talks cybersecurity threats

Feb 14, 2017

Mike Rogers, Former chair House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence
Credit Wikimedia Commons / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. intelligence community is investigating alleged Russian hacking of the Presidential election. It’s one of many cyber threats the country faces. A former national security expert and Michigan congressman is explaining these threats in-depth. 

In 2007 the Chinese government fired a missile targeting a satellite orbiting the planet at 18,000 mph. For the first time space was militarized.

“So if you’re in the security space you think, ‘hmm, this is a bit of a problem.”

Former chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Mike Rogers understands cyber security.

“So if you’re a country like China, they’re starting to build their carrier fleet, their on their second carrier, and they’re going to continue to do that, but what one way could you get at the United States to give them at least a strategic advantage and our disadvantage? You go after our satellites.”

That was just one threat to the United States the former FBI special agent provided. He also warns hackers are accessing uploads and downloads to those satellites and more.

“They have taken an autonomous car and slammed on the brakes at 70 mph.” And cases of hackers taking control of interactive Barbie Dolls.

If that wasn’t startling enough, Rogers, who sits on the IronNet Cybersecurity and MITRE Corporation boards and advises Next Century Corporation and Trident Capital, is concerned with policing the dark web because no one is certain of its size and scope.

“What we would do in our company is say we’re going to take your credentials and then we’re going to search the deep and dark web and see if they’re for sale anywhere and that’s how we would get at it.’ And through that process what we have found is you can start to map the deep and dark web.”

Mike Rogers was the keynote speaker for the Peter F. Secchia Breakfast Lecture held Monday at Grand Valley State University's L. William Seidman Center.

Patrick Center, WGVU News.