Mutually Inclusive

A WGVU initiative in partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation using on-air programs and community events to explore issues of inclusion and equity.

Sergeant Jon Wu, supervisor in the Vice Unit of the Grand Rapids Police Department, says as the state heads to potentially legalizing recreational marijuana the department is preparing to increase enforcement. 

“The way that some of the proposals are written now, there is going to be a pretty high tax on the marijuana that’s grown, and when you have a high tax on something you begin to have a black market in that to avoid that tax.” 

  

Scott Greenlee heads Healthy and Productive Michigan, a group of citizens trying to prevent the legalization of recreational marijuana in the state before it becomes “Big Tobacco 2.0.” 

“From a strategy standpoint, it is going to be a lot of education. We are going to really point out some of the myths that are going on with regard to the state of Colorado, and other states that have legalized it, and we want to prevent our great state from going through that.” 

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we talk about the Preparing Racially-diverse Educators Program (PREP) at Aquinas College. We welcome BeAnka Masefiade, a PREP Recruiter and Project Coordinator with the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative. Joining the discussion are WGVU inclusion reporter, Michelle Jokisch Polo, and WGVU grant Writer, Steve Chappell. This weekly radio segment is part of a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Hossein Ghaem

“Immigrants are walking through your doors every day, using their hard-earned income to support businesses and our local economy. This spending and support help further sustain our regional economic prosperity in more than commercial ways.” 

That’s Guillermo Cisneros, executive director of the West Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, reacting to the report, which was published by the New American Economy in conjunction with the City of Grand Rapids and other partners. It provides a snapshot of the economic impact foreign-born immigrants bring to Kent County. 

A Stitch in Time: Every Quilt has a story

Sep 13, 2018

Mae Black remembers vividly the urgency for change she felt living in the racially segregated south in the early 60s. 

“I had a big mouth and I could see myself being killed by talking back, because we was not allowed to talk back to Caucasians.”  

She was only 14 years old when she joined hundreds of Albany residents on a nine-hour train ride from Georgia to Washington D.C to march along Martin Luther King Jr. 

Feliciano Paredes

"We are at a point right now where the shortage in the agricultural industry is really causing a lot of issues across the whole, like in the agricultural ecosystem, like the dairy, the specialty crop which are those crops that require a lot of hand harvesting." 

That is Feliciano Paredes, who remembers traveling for several days in the back of his parent's truck in search of agricultural seasonal work from Texas to Michigan. 

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we welcome John Rumery, director of Grand Circus, and Anna Geurkink, coordinator of their Rising TIDE Project. This weekly radio segment is part of a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Joining the discussion is WGVU inclusion reporter, Michelle Jokisch Polo, and WGVU grant Writer, Steve Chappell.

Spenser

Alisha Lauchie, therapist certified in trauma focused behavioral therapy, she says that the African-American youths who were cuffed at gunpoint by Grand Rapids Police Department is not an isolated experience for children of color.

“I think we have to do as a community much better with treating our children as children. Essentially these were two boys that were in their neighbocrhood, on their street, not doing anything that was threatening or anything that was dangerous.” 

Wesley Morgan, local mental health professional says the children experienced a traumatic event.  

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