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How will GRPD's enforcement change if recreational Marijuana is legalized?

Sergeant Jon Wu, supervisor in the Vice Unit of the Grand Rapids Police Department, says as the state heads to potentially legalizing recreational marijuana the department is preparing to increase enforcement. “The way that some of the proposals are written now, there is going to be a pretty high tax on the marijuana that’s grown, and when you have a high tax on something you begin to have a black market in that to avoid that tax.” Officer JP Guerrero of the Grand Rapids Police Department...

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Four Michigan community mental health centers have been selected as Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics and are getting a boost in funding. U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan on Thursday announced the designation for Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services; Easter Seals Michigan in Auburn Hills; West Michigan Community Mental Health System in Ludington and HealthWest in Muskegon. 

A West Michigan man has been convicted of manslaughter in the death of his 14-month-old daughter, who drowned while unattended in a bathtub. A Muskegon County Circuit Court jury also found Justin Smutz guilty Wednesday of second-degree child abuse. He's jailed pending sentencing. Adalynn Grace Smutz died March 25, 2016, while in the bathtub with her 2-year-old half-brother.

Southwestern Michigan authorities say a man accused of killing his girlfriend is back behind bars after escaping from jail. Kalamazoo County sheriff's officials say the inmate had been in the county jail's recreation area on Wednesday when he climbed fences and escaped. He ditched his jail-issued orange jumpsuit after getting free, but was found by authorities about a half-hour later in the city wearing underwear and tennis shoes. He's expected to be charged Thursday in the escape. Jail officials are inspecting the fencing for any weak spots.

Associated Press

After a 2017 traffic stop study discovered racial bias in the Grand Rapids Police Department, an independent group charged with doing an internal review has released a series of recommendations for the GRPD to adopt. 

According to a press release from the city, "The recommendations fall in six areas of Grand Rapids Police Department policy review: staffing and deployment, internal affairs, training, youth interactions, community policing and crime reduction, and recruiting and hiring."

Sergeant Jon Wu, supervisor in the Vice Unit of the Grand Rapids Police Department, says as the state heads to potentially legalizing recreational marijuana the department is preparing to increase enforcement. 

“The way that some of the proposals are written now, there is going to be a pretty high tax on the marijuana that’s grown, and when you have a high tax on something you begin to have a black market in that to avoid that tax.” 

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The 10th international ArtPrize competition is kicking off its run in West Michigan. The event starts Wednesday and goes through Oct. 7. It features the work of more than 1,400 artists at more than 160 venues vying for $500,000 in cash prizes. ArtPrize officially opens with the midday "ArtPrize 10 Opening Whistle" event in Grand Rapids where a steam-powered train whistle sounds. Winners are announced Oct. 5 after public voting. 

Police have made about 10 arrests while clearing out a homeless camp in West Michigan that's been a focus of protests since last month seeking better resources for homeless people. The city of Kalamazoo had set a Tuesday evening deadline for people to leave Bronson Park and police arrived Wednesday morning, about 12 hours after the deadline passed, to clear the camp.

Daniel Boothe / WGVU NPR

After the recent discovery of water contaminated with poly-fluorinated chemicals in surrounding communities, the city of Muskegon’s water supply has been tested--and the results are in. 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions' future was cast further into doubt on Wednesday after President Trump made clear how broad his displeasure is with the man he tapped to lead the Department of Justice.

"I don't have an attorney general," Trump told Hill.TV in an interview on Tuesday.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

President Trump is in the flood-soaked Carolinas Wednesday where, under sunny skies, he is getting a firsthand look at the devastation that has killed dozens of people and displaced many thousands from their homes across the Southeast.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un says he will visit Seoul "in the near future," amid an ongoing summit with South Korea's Moon Jae-in in which he also renewed pledges to shut down a primary missile launch site and a key nuclear weapons complex if the U.S. takes "corresponding" measures.

Kim's remarks about traveling to Seoul were made during a news conference in Pyongyang with the South Korean president. It would be the first-ever visit to the South Korean capital by a North Korean head of state.

Fires, like all natural disasters, disproportionately affect those who are low income. They often lack insurance and resources to rebuild or move elsewhere. The effects on families and communities can be long-lasting.

After a high-profile campaign to oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline in 2016, a number of states moved to make it harder to protest oil and gas projects. Now in Louisiana, the first felony arrests of protesters could be a test case of these tougher laws as opponents vow a legal challenge.

Maria Butina, the Russian woman accused of working as an unregistered foreign agent, encouraged pro-gun demonstrations in the U.S. as early as 2014, according to messages provided to NPR.

Butina's work has been linked to Russia's attack on the 2016 election, but people who know her say she began trying to make her mark inside America years before.

NPR examined thousands of people who make up Butina's Facebook network, and reached out to a sample of more than two hundred individuals.

In 2016, photographer Joy Sharon Yi began taking the Metro to Barry Farm, a large public housing complex in Southeast Washington, D.C., built in 1943 on the first city settlement where African-Americans could buy property and build homes after the Civil War.

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