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Michigan groups fight travel ban

A handful of Michigan groups are renewing their fight against President Trump’s travel ban. It restricts people from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States. In June the United States Supreme Court said the travel ban that limits people from 7 countries can continue while its constitutionality is decided in court. The Michigan ACLU had already filed a lawsuit with organizations including the Arab American Civil Rights League and the American Arab Chamber of Commerce....

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Michigan groups fight travel ban

Sep 14, 2018

A handful of Michigan groups are renewing their fight against President Trump’s travel ban.  It restricts people from several Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

In June the United States Supreme Court said the travel ban that limits people from 7 countries can continue while its constitutionality is decided in court.

The Michigan ACLU had already filed a lawsuit with organizations including the Arab American Civil Rights League and the American Arab Chamber of Commerce.

The state is trying to figure out the “best way forward” for medical marijuana patients and shops. A judge ordered the state to allow ALL medical marijuana dispensaries to stay open while they wait for their licenses to be approved by a state board.

“This has been nothing but a roller coaster ride and it’s gotten higher and steeper.”

That’s attorney Denise Pollicella. She represents Montrowe dispensary.

The state said some shops could stay open while they wait for their license to be approved. But about 100 shops would have had to close by September 15th. 

The Michigan Public Service Commission has approved a nearly $9 million rate increase for DTE Gas Co. to invest in infrastructure, speed up the removal of inside gas meters and to spend more on its low-income assistance and self-sufficiency programs.

The increase approved Thursday compares with an $85 million annual increase DTE sought in its original request last November. It later adjusted that to $38 million.

Residential customers using an average of 10,000 cubic feet of natural gas per month will see a monthly increase of 95 cents, beginning with their October bills.

Scott Greenlee heads Healthy and Productive Michigan, a group of citizens trying to prevent the legalization of recreational marijuana in the state before it becomes “Big Tobacco 2.0.” 

“From a strategy standpoint, it is going to be a lot of education. We are going to really point out some of the myths that are going on with regard to the state of Colorado, and other states that have legalized it, and we want to prevent our great state from going through that.” 

Weekly we focus on the work of area organizations advancing inclusion and equity in our community. This morning we talk about the Preparing Racially-diverse Educators Program (PREP) at Aquinas College. We welcome BeAnka Masefiade, a PREP Recruiter and Project Coordinator with the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative. Joining the discussion are WGVU inclusion reporter, Michelle Jokisch Polo, and WGVU grant Writer, Steve Chappell. This weekly radio segment is part of a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

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The U.S. House voted 236-138 Thursday to tie a bow on President Obama's package of trade-related legislation — giving him final approval on everything he wanted.

The Senate already had signed off on all of it, granting: 1) enhanced trade negotiation powers to the president, 2) aid for displaced workers and 3) trade incentives for sub-Saharan Africa.

Thursday's vote marked a stunning victory for Obama by clearing his path to completing the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade deal involving the United States, Japan and 10 other Pacific Rim nations.

The Supreme Court ruling in favor of the Obama administration means 6.4 million people won't lose subsidies that helped them afford health insurance.

But the historic ruling in King v. Burwell may be far from the last word on health overhaul.

Bills to advance or cripple the law in statehouses didn't come to a halt in the months that lawmakers awaited the Supreme Court decision. They may well smolder for months or years.

We are reporting today on the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision to uphold the nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act. The court's majority opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts, who was joined by the court's liberal justices, as well as Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The Majority's Rationale

Civil rights groups won a victory Thursday, as the Supreme Court ruled that claims of racial discrimination in housing cases shouldn't be limited by questions of intent.

The court affirmed a Court of Appeals decision in a case in which a nonprofit group, the Inclusive Communities Project, said that the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs had contributed to "segregated housing patterns by allocating too many tax credits to housing in predominantly black inner-city areas and too few in predominantly white suburban neighborhoods."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Following the Supreme Court health care ruling to uphold subsidies nationwide, President Obama said Thursday that the Affordable Care Act is "here to stay."

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

President Obama, commenting on the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling today to uphold a key provision of his signature health care law, said after numerous challenges, the Affordable Care Act has been "woven into the fabric of America" and "is here to stay."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We are reporting today on the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision to uphold the nationwide subsidies called for in the Affordable Care Act. One of the three justices who opposed the ruling was Justice Antonin Scalia, who issued a strong dissent.

Here are some highlights:

'SCOTUSCare'

Supreme Court Upholds Obamacare Subsidies

Jun 25, 2015

The Affordable Care Act survived its second Supreme Court test in three years, raising odds for its survival but by no means ending the legal and political assaults on it five years after it became law.

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